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Journey author Robert Davis is the owner and creative director of Atlanta agency, Davis Advertising, Inc.

 

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Journey from Concept to Creation

There is far more to the creative process than learning how to use software and configure hardware. This blog addresses them.

Broadcast Media (Part Two).

Only published comments... Aug 23 2008, 09:00 PM by Adman

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Ok…we’ve established that the proper way to begin development of a media plan is to establish a GRP target for your proposed market(s). It is critical to have a sufficient number of GRP’s in order to achieve adequate reach and frequency. GRPs are presented according to ratings of demographic groups within specific market areas as defined by Nielsen’s® proprietary Designated Market Areas (DMAs) [or Arbitron® Area of Dominant Influende (ADI)]. They are presented according to programs or dayparts. Television dayparts include Early Morning (5am-9am), Daytime (9am-4pm), Early Fringe (4pm-8pm), Primetime (8pm-10pm), Late Evening (10pm-1am) and Late Night (1am-5am). Broadcast media reaches very large geographic markets.

   The above map of the Atlanta market (my home market) shows how the Nielsen DMA encompasses a large part of the state of Georgia, as well as counties in Alabama and North Carolina [with 2,310,490 TV households, Atlanta is ranked as the 8th largest DMA]. This is great if you are promoting a chain of stores with locations throughout the DMA, or a product such as our skin creme (from the previous blog) which has broad appeal. In these cases broadcast television would be an efficient buy; possibly more efficient than other media. On the other hand, if you are advertising a single store location that draws from a small area you would be wasting money by reaching beyond your geographic target market. Cable television would be a much better option [I’ll talk about cable TV in an upcoming blog]. Demographics can change significantly across large geographic areas -- from urban to rural, upscale to downscale, blue collar vs white collar, etc. Nevertheless, for many products larger markets mean far better economies of scale. It is the cost per thousand (CPM) (not overall cost) of reaching your target market that dictates a solid media buy.
   The ratings services have tightly defined market areas. Nielsen defines their coverage in terms of their proprietary “Designated Market Area” or DMA [Arbitron defines theirs as the “Area of Dominant Influence” (ADI).] These market areas are ranked annually by market size and the top-ten Nielsen markets are highly revered. The current ranking of DMAs is as follows:

   Nielsen DMAs are areas that receive the same television programming from a specific group of broadcast television stations. There are 210 Nielsen DMAs in the United States [286 Arbitron ADIs].

   Developed in the 1940’s by Arthur Nielsen, the Nielsen Ratings are provided for specific demographic groups (Demos) for each DMA. These ratings have been measured in a number of ways, including telephone surveys, diaries, and Set Meters, and People Meters. Out of the 210 measured Nielsen markets, the 56 largest are measured by meter technology. The remainder is measured by diaries only. Nielsen measures all local markets during designated "sweep" months of November, February, May and July. The ratings are used by local stations and cable systems to set local advertising rates and to make programming decisions. The term "sweep" came from the beginnings of the ratings system in the 1950's when diaries were mailed and processed, starting with the east coast and "sweeping" to the west coast -- people meter markets are measured 365 days a year. The networks go to great effort to attract viewers during the sweeps...the higher numbers they get during the sweeps, the more they can charge for advertising time. They are often criticized for their rates not reflecting typical programming...during the sweeps there is more special programming and original programming, etc., while outside of the sweeps it is more common to see reruns.
   Nielsen data is expressed as percentages and presented in terms of rating and share. A rating represents people who watch a particular program or daypart, expressed as a percentage within the universe of all TV households or a specific demographic group (demo) -- a rating of one represents one percent of TV Households. Demos are broken into 66 specific age group segments such as 18-49, 25-54, etc. Share represents the same viewers as a percentage of TV households or total persons actually watching television during the program or daypart -- it can be used as gauge of how a program or daypart competes with other available programs or dayparts.
   Nielsen has recently started providing consumer segmentation based on socio-economic data from PRIZM NE lifestyle group clusters -- Blue Blood Estates (six figure income executives and professionals), Young Digerati (tech savvy, fashionable, urban fringe), Bohemian Mix (progressive mix of young singles, couples, students and professionals), among others...as the ratings system has been criticized for being quantitative at the expense of qualitative. Nevertheless, qualitative data is available from numerous other sources. I will talk more about quantitative vs qualitative analysis in an upcoming blog.

 

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Broadcast Media (Part One). - Journey from Concept to Creation said:

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December 5, 2008 8:09 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> As I mentioned in a previous blog , my first exposure to media planning

December 5, 2008 8:12 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> As I mentioned in a previous blog , my first exposure to media planning

December 6, 2008 5:18 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> In my last blog , I mentioned that it is appropriate to think in terms

January 5, 2009 5:07 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> "Let me explain newspaper advertising to you," went my client's diatribe

June 3, 2009 6:58 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> As I mentioned in a previous blog , my first exposure to media planning

February 13, 2011 4:28 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> "Let me explain newspaper advertising to you," went my client's diatribe

July 8, 2011 8:48 PM

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About Adman

After developing his artistic abilities from an early age, Robert Davis (Adman) started his advertising career as a graphic artist for a commercial printing company while in 10th grade. He later acquired degrees in Commercial Art and (later) Business Administration (Marketing with focus on computer science) while working in various advertising agency capacities. Robert started his own agency in 1989. He added an in-house Pro Tools® recording studio in 1999 and an Avid Xpress® DV video editing suite in 2002. He now also has two Avid Media Composer suites and an Xpress Studio HD suite in a fully equipped studio which also features SoftImage|XSI and Pro Tools. He believes that his company, Davis Advertising, Inc., represents a new model for the 21st century advertising agency…”a small, agile and responsive agency wit1h comprehensive, in-house capabilities.” He says, “Avid® software provides the creative freedom and flexibility I covet.” His focus is on developing effective creative ideas via his own strategic planning process. He loves being surrounded by cameras, lights, props and other creative professionals who share his vision. He also, of course, loves working with Avid® software to bring his ideas to life. Currently residing in metro-Atlanta, Robert is an accomplished writer, producer and creative director. His advertising agency has served Fortune 500 accounts and has received several international awards. His work has been exhibited at the prestigious Cannes Lions Advertising Festival. When not riding his vintage Italian racing bike, or working out with free weights, Robert can often be found in the late evening singing or playing drums, guitars and keyboards in the studio.

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